Tag Archives: Color scheme

A Perfect 10 – Foliage Plants for August Refreshment

August of 2015 has been a continuation of an epic drought for much of the country. When the landscape is looking much more BROWN than normal in the dog days of summer, finding cool and refreshing foliage sounds pretty darn great!

Gold Caryopteris is a wonderful contrast to this vibrant Liatris.

Gold Caryopteris is a wonderful contrast to this vibrant Liatris.

A simple post this week that demonstrates ALL photos taken in the heat of August, and featuring lemon-fresh, cool foliage combination ideas for you to consider in your landscape. Some for sun, some for shade, but many that are easy to create in your own garden.

Hopefully these ideas are both inspiring and refreshing at the same time! 

Deep red barberry with a wonderfully defined gold ring around the edge is fab sitting out over the 'Lemon-Fizz' Santolina underneath.

Deep red barberry with a wonderfully defined gold ring around the edge is fab sitting out over the ‘Lemon-Fizz’ Santolina underneath.

Spirea 'Ogon' is a knock-out next to this dramatic black Actea.

Spirea ‘Ogon’ is a knock-out next to this dramatic black Actea.

How PERFECT is this dramatic black entry flanked by golden arborvitae?

How PERFECT is this dramatic black entry flanked by golden arborvitae?

Yucca 'Bright Star' positively glows against this blue container with sparkly blue gravel top-dressing.

Yucca ‘Bright Star’ positively glows against this blue container with sparkly blue gravel top-dressing.

Even this small speck of Sedum 'Angelina' makes a huge statement when next to the royal purple of simple lobelia.

Even this small speck of Sedum ‘Angelina’ makes a huge statement when next to the royal purple of simple lobelia.

Uplighting this collectors Japanese maple, a dwarf Ginkgo is THE feature element in a container with the bright chartreuse color.

Uplighting this collectors Japanese maple, a dwarf Ginkgo is THE feature element in a container with the bright chartreuse color.

 

Gold Spike Moss can be finicky about finding its happy spot, but when you do...... :-)

Gold Spike Moss can be finicky about finding its happy spot, but when you do…… 🙂

Gold Carex grass is a perfect companion for this garden art.

Gold Carex grass is a perfect companion for this garden art.

Gold Mexican Orange is epic placed next to the blooms of the Dwarf Russian Sage.

Gold Mexican Orange is epic placed next to the blooms of the Dwarf Russian Sage.

So what looks refreshing as a lemonade stand on a hot summer day in your garden right now?  Tell us about it in the comments below or post a photo to our Facebook page; we’d love to hear your news.

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Beautify Your Edibles

Add flowers - and fun to liven up your edibles

Add flowers – and fun to liven up your edibles (Fruit from http://www.awpottery.com)

We’ve been seeing some truly beautiful vegetable gardens this summer. Word has clearly got out that many of our favorite edibles have highly ornamental foliage that don’t need to be hidden away. Not only that but by looking for fun color echoes and contrasts you can create some striking vignettes and combinations.

Golden creeping Jenny festoons over the edge of this elevated container. A perfectly balanced design by our friends Peggy and Al Shelley

Golden creeping Jenny festoons over the edge of this elevated container. A perfectly balanced design by our friends Peggy and Al Shelley

Our new book will showcase a few ideas but we thought you’d like a peek into our photo library to see what happens when you build a design by putting foliage FIRST – even if you’re going to eat it later – and add other colorful leaves, flowers and accessories.

Surprising Color Inspiration

Turn beans into a dazzling wall of color by planting tall lilies next to them

Turn beans into a dazzling wall of color by planting tall lilies next to them

Beans and peas are a summer staple and quickly smother a trellis with lush  leaves and dangling pods. Some varieties of bean have golden leaves, a few have colorful flowers and there are some exciting colored beans to choose from too but what do you do when yours are just ordinary green-leaved green-beans?

The design above was the mastermind of Whidbey Island, WA gardener/designer Elaine Michaelides as she selected lilies that echo the color of the structure behind it. These tall lilies grow  as tall as the beans bringing color just where you need it. Stunning.

Look around – do you have a colorful chair, container or cushion you can use as a springboard?

Keep it Simple

Swiss chard and Shenandoah switch grass - perfect partners

Swiss chard and Shenandoah switch grass – perfect partners

This easy combo was part of a street-side planting in Langley on Whidbey Island, WA.

What about yellow chard with golden grasses?  Bowle’s Golden sedge (Carex elata ‘Aurea’) would be pretty in a partially shaded setting.

Or  the finely green and white variegated Overdam feather reed grass (Calamgrostis x acutiflora ‘Overdam’) with white chard for full or part sun.

A movable feast

Sunny yellows brighten bold silver-grey leaves

Sunny yellows brighten bold silver-grey leaves; Epcot 2014

Artichokes are undeniably one of the most exciting, architectural vegetables in the garden with wide deeply serrated silver foliage and tall stems that bear blue thistle-like flowers followed by the edible artichoke itself.

Silver can read rather ‘grey’ in the garden, however, unless you brighten it with something fun like sunny yellow as the gardeners at Epcot did last year. They planted the artichoke in a vivid yellow wheelbarrow and surrounded it with yellow daisies – fabulous! Trailing bronze sweet potato vine tumbling from the wheelbarrow adds a finishing touch and ties visually to the nearby purple chair (and the color of the soon to follow artichoke blooms). Genius.

Small Space Solutions

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Pallet gardens at Epcot

Even if you only have tiny planting pockets such as these pallet gardens, you can still get a designer look. Notice how the edible foliage textures and colors vary yet order is achieved by planting just one variety per row. A bright yellow chair and a few strips of cheery annuals makes sure the pollinators come to visit as well creating as a visual feast for us.

Escape route!

Break out of the vegetable garden!

Break out of the vegetable garden.

This pumpkin mingles happily with golden hyssop, coral bells and abelia in a street-side planting in Langley, WA – and why not? Big, bold leaves and sunny yellow flowers as well as attractive fruit make this every bit as ornamental as neighboring shrubs.

Rhubarb and rhodies

Rhubarb and rhodies

I do something similar with my rhubarb and grow it in front of rhododendrons. The deer don’t eat it so there’s no reason for me to take up space in my fenced vegetable garden and I love the ornamental value it adds to the border.

What good ideas have you seen this summer? Leave us a comment below or tell us on Facebook!

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Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage

Getting FIERCE with Fine FoliageSummer is no time to be timid with your landscape design. We only have a short window for this garden magnificence and TEAM Fine Foliage says that you need to GO FOR IT! Whether in container or more large-scale, your garden should be a place that fills you with joy and excitement.
The color bonanza above is a BOLD over-the-top example and obviously not all of us can do this but please, this post BEGS you to imagine your world beyond the typical and everyday plants. Get crazy, think out of the box, try new things!
Getting FIERCE with Fine FoliageOur post is LOADED this week with tropical feeling inspiration to shake you up a bit and get your design juices flowing with ideas that YOU can try. You can take these ideas and translate them from the idea of color schemes, textural ideas, scale, etc. The point is to study what brings you inspiration to try something NEW!
Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage
Cool colors are your thing? Easy-peasy! This bromeliad sports quite the handsome lavender glow in the pot where a simple variegated ivy snuggles up the base of the plant and acts like an uplight. What could you use in place of this giant collectors plant that might be hardy in your garden?
Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage
Do you yearn for a feminine esthetic? Citrus colors mixed with pale pink in this scene are not only soft and refined, but BOLD! 
Getting FIERCE with Fine FoliageIf you simply MUST have your geraniums, then why not pair them with euphorbia ‘Fire Sticks’ and Carex ‘Cappuccino’ to mix it up a bit and try something unexpected.

Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage

The wow factor of these colors together is undeniable. Both subtle AND kind of savage at the same time! Acalypha and dracaena make fine friends in a container that compliments them with so much style!
Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage
Could this dracaena BE any more well named? ‘Colorama’! Paired here in a captivating graphic combination with ‘Saffron-Spike’ Aphelandra they are a designers dream for inspiring new ideas! I know that your brain is just zooming with ideas isn’t it? This is how we come up with new ideas and plant combinations, we take fantasy and apply it to our own small-scale gardens and containers. What would your foliage plant combo be based on THIS photo?

Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage
HOLY COLOR WHEEL BATMAN! Yes, that is a LOT of color. Clear, true primary colors always work together. But here, the take away is to notice the strong, broad strappy leaves of the bromeliads give a green place for your eye to rest and cool off. So, even though this is based on flowers, it’s a foliage that saves the day!

Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage
The use of tasty edibles in containers is classy against the off-white stucco, but the DRAMA of the giant lemon colored schefflera in a deep blue pot adds that spark of powerful intensity. Not only that, it beautifully echoes the tile art on the wall too. 

Here is a peek at how I translated a little bit of FIERCE into a container for one of my more adventurous clients this summer.
Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage

Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage

Have you got some tough shade but still want to have some intense combinations? Here are the couple of powerful combos that are under the shade of large trees. See? Scale, drama, texture bring this to design fruition with only a few small blooms!
Getting FIERCE with Fine FoliageGetting FIERCE with Fine Foliage
Here is my take on these extraordinary combinations for a shade container for that same courageous client….
Getting FIERCE with Fine Foliage


Now go out there and snap some photos of YOUR FIERCE Fine Foliage designs and share them with us on Facebook!

 

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Potted Inspiration

Remember this luscious pairing? Great bromeliad-pot combo at Flora Grubb Gardens, San Francisco

Remember this luscious pairing? Great bromeliad-pot combo at Flora Grubb Gardens, San Francisco

A couple of year ago we brought you color inspiration from our trip to Flora Grubb Gardens in San Francisco as we shared the dramatic ways they had taken the  color of a container as a springboard for the foliage planted in it. You can enjoy it again here

Well we decided it was time for an update so here for your potted pleasure is a smorgasbord of fabulous containers and foliage divas that were simply meant to be together.

Unexpected Companions

Rustic meets contemporary thanks to the skill of Graham Smyth, Victoria BC

Rustic meets contemporary thanks to the skill of Graham Smyth, Victoria BC

Putting succulents in a rustic container would have been fun and matching the shade of the teal foliage to the patina of the pot would have been clever. Adding fossils? Now that’s genius! They add to the sense of antiquity, bring the paler color of the house stucco into the pot and introduce a new texture.

Plan ahead

Consider the four season color palette when adding plants to a pot

Consider the four season color palette when adding plants to a pot

Clearly the Pomegranate Punch million bells play a key role in echoing the pot color of this summer design but there’s more! Black mondo grass is evergreen and accents the faded detail around the container rim year round. The key plant; Tiger Eyes Sumac will display shades of orange, gold and red in fall and when the leaves eventually drop the remaining fuzzy branches will be a shade of dusky rose, the warm note continuing to enhance the container and vice versa.

Pull a Vignette Together

Use the container to link the colors and style of the surroundings to the pot design

Use the container to link the colors and style of the surroundings to the pot design

This bold orange pot works as a focal point in the loose meadow-like planting, defining the color scheme and connecting the backdrop to the potted pheasant tail grass and berried wintergreen

When Procrastination Works

Serendipity and artistry combine in this pairing by designer Stacie Crooks of Crooks Garden Design

Serendipity and artistry combine in this pairing by designer Stacie Crooks of Crooks Garden Design

Designer Stacie Crooks never quite got around to cutting off the dead flowers of this donkey tail spurge – and aren’t we glad?! The succulent-like foliage of the spurge echo the rustic teal pot while the faded flowers relate to the brick detail on the pathway. Tufts of black mondo grass add color and texture contrast.

Aqua Shades

Contemporary wizardry by Todd Holloway of Pot Inc

Contemporary wizardry by Todd Holloway of Pot Inc

From shallow hanging planters to narrow trapezoid containers and a low bowl the shades of silver-grey and aquamarine set the color palette while the contemporary shapes suggest plants with ‘personality’ are a must. Todd used assorted succulents and other drought tolerant plants to get the look. You can read more here.

What are your pots telling you? Post a photo on our Facebook page – we love to see your ideas! Or leave us a comment below.

 

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Vibrant Color, Bold Design

Vibrant Color, Bold Design

Want vibrant colors in cool shady locations? If you’re focusing on the flowers first, it can be hard to come by. But I would defy anyone to try to tell me that it’s not possible to create BOLD and colorful combinations when you begin with foliage in lower light conditions. Though you need to fully understand the particular quality of light or lack of light you have in your situation, you CAN find options for foliage combinations in the shade in both containers and landscapes.

Morning shade has an entirely different light quality than afternoon shade. Dappled light all day is going to be a totally different challenge as would full deep shade. So, watch what your light does at different times of the day, as well as how many hours you have total and that will go a long way to helping you understand what your options are for plant choices. One tip: the sun rises in the east and sets in the west. You would be shocked at how many people don’t think about where the light on their property actually comes from. 🙂

Vibrant Color, Bold Design
(In this combination: Coleus ‘Sedona’, Heuchera ‘Spellbound’, ‘Gartenmeister’ Fuchsia, Oxalis ‘Iron Cross’, Golden Feverfew, Fuchsia ‘Autumnale’, ‘Purple Heart’ Setcresea, Blue Anagalis, Blue ‘Techno Heat’ Lobelia, Violet New Guinea Impatien.)
The combination above sits in a cool location on the north side of the house where it gets bright morning light for a few hours, then a little bit of bright light for a bit right before sundown. It has a cool side that features the mainstay foliage and then a warm side that features the flowers. This container was newly planted not long ago and is just now powering up for the summer color show.

Vibrant Color, Bold Design
Vibrant Color, Bold Design

This portion of the container combination is in bright but very indirect light on the west side of the house where it is blocked by large hedges and trees from the warmth of the afternoon. This triad of foliage is exciting in its level of detail and texture as it stands on the side of other more fine textured foliage. (Rex begonia, Persian Shield, Heuchera ‘Midnight Rose’).

Vibrant Color, Bold Design

This container rests on a mostly shaded, covered patio, although it’s not terribly bright it is very warm and dry. The warmth allows for a little bit of play with certain plants that typically want more sun, so we’re capitalizing on that in less light. Pictured here: Cordyline fruticosa, ‘Black Heart’ Potato Vine, Coleus, Persian Shield, Rex begonia, Euphorbia ‘Diamond Frost’.

Vibrant Color, Bold Design
This foliage based shade combination has few flowers, but boasts some BOLD elements in a dappled light location. High contrast colors and textures, not to mention unusual plant selections make for a fun and architectural container design. This one is also newly planted and will “fluff out” quite a bit as summer progresses. Pictured here: Cordyline fruticosa, African Mask Alocasia, Stachys ‘Bella Grigio’, bright pink Bromeliad, Pink ‘Non-Stop’ Begonia, Golden Pothos.

As you have now witnessed, you CAN have amazing, mouth-watering color and texture from foliage in shade. If you can dream it, you can do it! Think out of the box, try shopping in the houseplant section, ground covers, etc. and for heaven’s sake, get to know your shade conditions first!! Now get out there and do some designing!

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Simple yet Sophisticated

IMG_2855I planted up this little container for a demonstration during my one of my Spring Container Workshops last week. It’s a lesson in balancing abundance and restraint.

Size Matters

The rustic brown clay pot is just 12″ square so the temptation would be to fill it with lots of 4″ plants. Had I done that, however, the overall composition may have looked too busy. Instead I opted to use three gallon (6″) sized plants to really fill out the space with leafy goodness, adding just one 4″ and one 2″ accent plants.

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Foliage Stars

The feature plant is the cream/green variegated Angyo Star Fatshedera, one of the Sunset Western Garden Plant Collection beauties. This will need to be staked as it grows taller but I may just let it tumble and mingle to a degree; we’ll see! The glossy leaves suggest a tropical look but I’ve used it here in a more naturalistic design where it’s resemblance to ivy works well.

Playing off the creamy yellow tones I added the grass-like Everillo Carex to introduce fine strappy texture. The bright golden foliage works well with this informal container.

The third ‘big’ plant was Sweet Tea Heucherella, a favorite for its over-sized copper leaves and distinctive purple veins. Spires of fluffy white flowers are a bonus.

Final Details

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It was love at first sight when I saw these 4″ pots of Sparks Will Fly begonias; look at those black leaves! The orange flowers echoed the color of the Heucherella foliage and played off the warm sunset color scheme. Perfect to tuck into the corner of the container.

Purple Heart was tucked in a corner near the golden grass

Purple Heart was tucked in a corner near the golden grass

Also added but not visible in these photos  is a 2″ pot of Purple Heart wandering Jew (Setcreasea pallida ‘Purple Heart’ syn. Tradescantia pallida ‘Purple Heart’). The iridescent purple leaves picks up the vein color of the Heucherella and adds contrast to the golden grass.

Design Details

By using just five plants (three of them BIG) and by restricting the number of colors (gold, copper-orange and purple-black) this little container lives large. It has a full, lush look thanks to the foliage; no waiting for it to ‘grow in’ before being ready for its close up.

The three main foliage plants are all evergreen so can be kept in the container or transferred to the garden.

This combination will thrive in shade or partial shade all summer with average water.

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Celebrate the Spring Foliage Fashion Show

Red barrenwort - also known as Bishop's hat in the UK

Red barrenwort (Epimedium x rubrum) also known as Bishop’s hat in the UK

I can’t help it – my heart skips a beat when I walk into a nursery at this time of year. I find myself reaching out to touch herbs, smell viburnums…and swoon at the sight of barrenwort  (Epimedium). It’s a sad affliction really but there is something about these wonderfully old fashioned perennials that makes me smile. Memories of my gardens in England perhaps or the relief that after winter we can once again enjoy the simple pleasures of reliable, colorful old friends that just get bigger and better every year.

IMG_3311

Frohnleiten barrenwort (Epimedium × perralchicum ‘Frohnleiten’); marbled foliage and sulfur yellow flowers

So what’s so special about barrenwort?

  • The new heart shaped foliage is outstanding, usually at least tinged with red but often intensely colored
  • Dainty flowers dance high above the leaves in early spring
  • Many are evergreen
  • Drought tolerant
  • Deer resistant
  • Rabbit resistant
  • Spreads slowly to form a groundcover
  • Smaller plants work well in containers
  • Tolerates dry shade

Combination ideas

IMG_3324Dainty orange and yellow spidery flowers of Amber Queen barrenwort (Epimedium ‘Amber Queen’) dance above the golden Tom Thumb spruce (Picea orientalis ‘Tom Thumb’). The semi-evergreen elongated leaves of the barrenwort promise an exciting display very soon as burgundy mottling is already developing.

IMG_3333For additional color blend blue hostas and black mondo grass into this scene.

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Create a carpet under deciduous trees. Frohnleiten barrenwort is seen above with smoky purple hellebores adding depth and a large mugo pine offering year round structure.

IMG_3338For a seasonal garden moment you can’t do much better than capturing the brief relationship between the purple foliage of Gerald Derby iris and lavender flowers of Lilafee barrenwort (Epimedium x grandiflorum ‘Lilafee’). Each plant is more striking for its relationship with the other but this distinctive color is only for a very brief time. Be ready to party!

Cultural info

Barrenwort are generally hardy in zones 5-8 and prefer partial shade or full shade in average-dry soil.

Divide in autumn or after blooming

Design credit throughout; Mitch Evans, Redmond WA

 

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Foliage for your Spring Floozies

 

From the Gold Medal winning garden by West Seattle Nursery - Northwest Flower & Garden Show 2015

From the Gold Medal winning garden by West Seattle Nursery – Northwest Flower & Garden Show 2015

Gardeners are easily seduced. We understand – sometimes that flirty petal just calls to you but if you don’t give it the right foliage partner it will be a fizzled floozy in no time.

Spring bulbs and pansies leap onto our shopping carts at this time of year don’t they? While you’re at the nursery be sure to select some foliage beauties to create the necessary framework to make them shine and fill the beauty gap when the blooms are less than bountiful.

Here are a few of our favorite foliage+floozy options to try.

Pansies 

IMG_8686Who can resist the cute pansy faces? Whiskers, bold colors, frills – these are the flowers of our childhood.

Choose accompanying foliage plants to echo the colors. I have found that the fine strappy blades of grasses offer great contrast to the chubby faces as can be seen above where the golden variegated Japanese sweet flag (Acorus gramineus ‘Ogon’) accents the golden moment.

IMG_0514Or look for something more subtle. Here variegated box honeysuckle (Lonicera nitida ‘Lemon Beauty’) repeats the yellow eye in the blue and purple pansy.

In either case there is a visual color connection between the flower and foliage.

JH pansyThis simple combination has  color repetition between the yellow of the pansy and Angelina sedum (Sedum rupestre ‘Angelina’) but the most striking theme is the connection of fine pansy ‘whiskers’ and the strongly vertical lines of the common rush; a green grass-like foliage plant  (Juncus).

Tulips

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Big, bold and beautiful – marry these extravagant blooms with equally sassy foliage. Princess Irene tulip is planted here with the similarly colored Peach Flambe heuchera while the chartreuse conifer Goldcrest Monterey cypress adds contrast.

IMG_0909Or go for moody drama with rich purple tulips against black mondo grass (Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’). Emerald green ferns and Rainbow leucothoe (Leucothoe f. ‘Rainbow’) add lighter notes, the variegated shrub even hinting at burgundy-purple tints.

Floozy Frenzy!

IMG_2006Hellebore, hyacinth, candytuft – yes there’s a lot of floral action going on but it’s all held together with foliage. Silver Queen euonymus establishes the soft color scheme and adds strength to the combination of looser structures. The large purple foliage of Spellbound heuchera adds drama while a simple cotoneaster groundcover trails over the edge of the stone urn. All the foliage plants are evergreen, allowing the flowers to come and go without compromising the design.

Remember flowers are fleeting so enjoy their ephemeral beauty and seduction – but be sure to have great foliage tucked in alongside them for real drama that lasts.

 

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A Stormy Day for Fine Foliage

Stormy Day Fine Foliage

Left to right; ‘Rainbow’ Leaucothoe is showing off some new cold weather burgundy foliage for winter. A favorite conifer Thuja Occidentalis ‘Rheingold’ is coloring up nicely for winter as it warms up with orange and amber tones. My STAR conifer in this bed is Chamaecyparis lawsoniana ‘Wissel’s Saguaro’ he is growing in nicely! Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’ is a soft accent texture in the small bed with its swaying plumes. Osmanthus ‘Goshiki’ is the toughest character in this little gang, drought tolerant with foliage that has interesting color changes through the entire year. Down low is Nandina ‘Gulf Stream’ giving a bold red uplight to the group next to the more somber deep tones of the ‘Crimson Pygmy’ Barberry.

When rain, wind and flooding storms are pummeling both the East and West coasts at the same time, it can seem like there is no reason to find joy in the garden, but Fine Foliage is here to cheer you on and say YES! There are always gorgeous things to be appreciated in the garden no matter the weather. I ran outside in my jammies THIS MORNING and took a few shots in my own garden to show you that it is true!

You just have to do a little simple planning. In fact I kind of enjoy the challenge of proving this point, I get to go to the nursery and browse and that’s always a fun job. 😉

So, how do WE do it? It means that when it is NOT ugly, dark, gray and wet, you have to stand out in the glaring sunshine in spring or summer with one eagle eye imagining THIS day to come. I often take my clients outside on a gray day such as this, all of us in our rain gear, umbrellas in hand and I ask them to stand at the driveway and imagine what exactly they want to see when they pull the car up after a hard day of work. Do you want neat clean and tidy clipped hedges? Can Do! Do you want COLOR? Can do! We just have to be thinking about in earlier in the year and talk about WHAT COLOR MEANS for the garden in fall and winter.

Inevitably, a client will say “What about all of the flowers?” Well, that’s a bit tougher. Even in our mild climate in the Northwest. Viola’s and Pansies are not terribly big fans of our constant rain and it’s a little early to appreciate many Hellebore and Primroses in bloom yet.

Cryptomeria 'Black Dragon' anchors this combo pot, paired with a lovely native Mahonia nervosa blushing in the cold with a subtle purple, Heuchera 'Berry Smoothie' gives a large leaf respite to all of the smaller foliage detail. The lacy and vibrant purple Kale is perfect snuggled with 'Ducksfoot' Ivy peeking out around the base of the pot.

Cryptomeria ‘Black Dragon’ anchors this combo pot, paired with a lovely native Mahonia nervosa blushing in the cold with a subtle purple, Heuchera ‘Berry Smoothie’ giving a large leaf respite to all of the smaller foliage detail. The lacy and vibrant purple Peacock Red’ Ornamental Kale is perfect snuggled with Ducksfoot’ Ivy peeking out around the base of the pot. The cut Red Twig Dogwood twigs in this pot add just the right touch of bright red for the season too!

Just look at all of the COLOR we have with no flowers! This is just what Fine Foliage in your garden does the very best. It gives these cold, drab days with seemingly nothing to see a focus, a point to look at that warms your heart and makes you feel that every time of the year is worth appreciating in the garden. Rain or shine Fine Foliage can be found everywhere if you just look!

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Need Some Winter Foliage Inspiration?

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Then head to your local independent garden center! We are blessed with an abundance of first class nurseries in the Seattle area. Staffed by professional horticulturalists, keen home gardeners and part time designers you can always be assured of finding a great selection of plants, expert advice and most importantly at this time of year – ideas!

I wanted to freshen up the containers on my front porch this weekend and had planned to gather greenery and holly from the woods at the back of the property. Only one problem – they are covered in a few inches of frozen snow which doesn’t seem to be melting anytime soon. I can also usually dig up a few things from the garden to tuck in such as young evergreen shrubs and trailing periwinkle but that isn’t possible either. So when the ice melts on the roads a bit I’ll be heading out to a nursery to gather my ingredients.

Here’s what I found at Sky Nursery in Shoreline, Seattle last December.

1. Oval metal planters

Designer credit; Stephanie, Sky Nursery

Designer credit; Stephanie, Sky Nursery

Why it Works

Simple and elegant this design has a crisp green, red and white color scheme with a few tasteful metallic accents. Notice how the silver sprays echo the washed grey metal containers- great attention to detail.

Foliage Framework

Young upright conifer

Small evergreen fern

Green and white variegated grass

Bright green moss to hide the soil

Accents

Jacob hellebore

White pansy

Red cyclamen (also has great foliage)

Berried wintergreen (small glossy evergreen leaves too)

Decorative silver spray stems

Sheer gold ribbon

2. Round birch pot

Designer credit; Stephanie, Sky Nursery

Designer credit; Stephanie, Sky Nursery

Why it works

The rustic pots leads the design style here. All foliage and flowering elements follow a simple monochromatic green and white theme with only the bow adding a touch of contrasting color

Foliage Framework

Dwarf mounding conifer

Green and white variegated euonymus (Euonymus f. ‘Emerald Gaity’)

Silver icicle plant (or substitute a silvery lavender)

Grey Spanish moss to trim the pot

Accents

White cyclamen (gorgeous green and white foliage too)

White pansy

White flocked branches

Sheer burgundy bow

3. Tiered fountain

IMG_1166This design would only work if the fountain was in a covered courtyard – otherwise the tiers would fill with water and rot the plants. However we can still get ideas for plant combinations to add to our containers out in the garden.

Why it Works

All three tiers have a common color scheme yet use different plants to get the effect.

Plants are repeated around each tier for a unified look

Foliage Framework and Accents

Top tier;

Green and white variegated grasses

Berried wintergreen

Green and white trailing ivy

Middle tier;

Silver Astelia (the grass-like plant with wide blades)

Deer fern

Icicle plant

White pansies

Lower tier;

Soft burgundy coral bells

Green and white trailing ivy

White pansies

4. Final Flourishes

IMG_1197Look past the large number and varieties of plants here to get ideas for adding the fun factor.

The tiered stand to the left could easily be a re-purposed pot stand, or perhaps an old kitchen produce holder. Each section is lined with moss as you would a hanging basket then filled with soil and plants.

The tall green pot may not be planted at all and just acting as a pedestal. There appears to be a ‘nest’ of wood excelsior that is acting as the shallow planter. Placed over the top is a rusted metal frame. Is it a hanging basket frame placed upside down? Or a cloche without the protective fabric or glass? Or a cake dome??? I’ve no idea – but maybe I have something in the barn like this that I can use. Do you? A few thin twisted branches have been inserted too, helping keep the arrangement loose.

Ready to go shopping?

 

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