Tag Archives: Heucherella ‘Stoplight’

Winter Roses? It’s ALL About the LEAVES

Penny's Pink Hellebore

Penny’s Pink Hellebore

No matter whether you call them Winter Rose, Lenten Rose or Christmas Rose, the elegant winter blooming perennial formally called helleborus or hellebore is no slouch performer in the winter garden. Prized for the stunning blooms they provide, some early cultivars begin blooming at the holidays and then later blooming options that can power on for months into early spring. Many have blooms that evolve and change color, lasting as late as May before needing to be tidied up so that other super star plants can take the stage.

However, Team Fine Foliage dares to show you the OTHER facet of the gorgeous hellebore, the FOLIAGE! The options are amazing for foliage that is mostly evergreen, tough as nails and so showy. So, grab a cup of your favorite warm winter beverage, snuggle up if you are stuck in the snow and have a long look at what unique and stunning options you have for splashy cold season leaves.

Hellebore 'Winter Moonbeam'

Hellebore ‘Winter Moonbeam’ has a fun speckled pattern that is fabulous when mixed with other patterned foliage. Heucherella ‘Stoplight’ showing beautiful winter color too. Note the subtle burgundy centers on this hellebore and how the two plants compliment each other with “color echoes”. 

This exciting new hybrid ‘Winter Moonbeam’ has many foliage facets depending on the particular plant and exposure. You could have some luscious variations of the creamy moon beam white color. Be sure to follow the link to see the variations!

'Winter Moonbeam' is lovely in the rain!

‘Winter Moonbeam’ is lovely in the rain!

'Winter Moonbeam' hellebore

‘Winter Moonbeam’ hellebore

Hellebore 'Silver Dollar' with a deep dark heuchera shines like only valuable silver can!

Hellebore ‘Silver Dollar’ with a deep dark heuchera shines like only valuable silver can!

The heavily toothed ‘Silver Dollar’ hellebore is small but mighty. Can you see the “color echo” here? This is one of the design tools that Team Fine Foliage likes to illustrate in our many talks. Those subtle cues that link plants together by color, we call them a “color echo”. In winter when you don’t necessarily have the bold, brash and bawdy combinations that you can take in at a glance. You have to look closely and appreciate the small details.

Hellebore 'Silver Dollar'

Hellebore ‘Silver Dollar’

THIS ‘Silver Dollar’ hellebore is showing more of a red center than the one above and the green veining on the particular plants foliage is highly contrasted with the super silvery foliage. But, when you layer this one next to the bright green Rockfoil (Saxifrage arenas) foliage, WOW, that green pops!

Hellebore 'Silver Dollar'

Hellebore ‘Silver Dollar’ in the winter sunshine lights up the garden and container.

Helleborus f. 'Wester Flisk'

Hellebore ‘Wester Flisk’

Don’t let the name of THIS gorgeous hellebore keep you away from these leaves in your garden!    The Bearsfoot or Stinking hellebore has long, narrow leaves with a toothed edge that lends great textural interest to so many wonderful garden combinations. Formally called Helleborus foetidus or Fetid Hellebore, this lovely hybrid called ‘Wester Flisk’ brings a warm red-toned detail into the garden. This particular hybrid may not be fully evergreen in some colder climates, but it will emerge and leaf out early. Check here for more details on this fabulous plant. 

Hellebore 'Gold Bullion' paired with a showy patterned Heuchera

Hellebore ‘Gold Bullion’ paired with a showy patterned Heuchera

The sensational Bearsfoot hellebore is a flexible option for foliage combinations throughout the year. But, in late winter and early spring, the bolder ‘Gold Bullion’ gives a bit of the sunny warmth of golden tones that we crave this time of the year, particularly in low light locations.

This container shines in  a shady forest location between the 'gold Bullion' hellebore and the red pot, it brings sunny warmth to the shade!

This container shines in a forested setting, between the ‘Gold Bullion’ hellebore and the red pot, it brings sunny warmth to the shade!

'Silver Lace' hellebore shines against a gray-green spruce shrub.

‘Silver Lace’ hellebore shines against a gray-green spruce shrub.

Also known as the ‘Corsican’ hellebore, this particular plant named Hellebores argutifolius ‘Silver Lace’ is one tough plant! The leathery leaves in glowing silver will reward you in late winter, early spring voluminous apple-green blooms on a plant that can grow 3ft. tall and wide. As if that weren’t enough, this one in particular is VERY deer resistant. It’s not tender and tasty enough!

The plants we’ve shown off for you this week are all listed as being shade tolerant, and mostly indestructible. But, be sure to ask a horticulturist at your local independent garden center for hellebore’s with sassy and splashy foliage that will be happy in your zone.

If you think you NEED flowers to be satisfied in the winter garden, think again!

And now for something WE think you’ll really LOVE! One half of Team Fine Foliage, Karen Chapman has created a fantastic video gardening series with Craftsy.com and now she is a FINALIST in the Craftsy Blogger Awards contest for the BEST INSTRUCTORS BLOG -FINE FOLIAGE!!!!

We would be SO honored to have your vote and if you are so inclined to share this post, we are on the last day voting! Thanks in advance for ALL of your amazing support!
Nominateme1

 

Pattern Play – Mixing It Up with Fine Foliage

In fashion we combine stripes and solids, plaids and polka-dots, and florals both large and small together. For some, it’s easy breezy to look into the depths of our drawers and closets and put together a combination that looks effortless and pulled together. For MANY of us, it takes a bit of practice. But, with some simple tips, you can easily translate the same ideas with your landscape and container designs with exceptional foliage plants any season of the year.

Pattern Play- Mixing It Up with Fine Foliage

Rosy fall color on Heuchera ‘Electra’ shows the amazing burgundy veining detail against the chartreuse background and harmonizes with the copper tones in the container, while the draping, silvery Lamium foliage gives some tonal contrast and pattern that keeps the duo from feeling heavy.

Looking at the larger view of the rich fall container design, you get the sense for the how the foliage colors all work together.

Looking at the larger view of the rich fall container design, you get the sense for the how the foliage colors all work together.

Limit your color palette.
When you want to create subtle or dramatic color combinations with foliage patterns, it is vital that you don’t get all CLOWNPANTS! From the container, to the focal point plant, keep your color palette tighter, without going TOO matchy-matchy when working with patterned foliage. The bolder the pattern, the more you will need to keep it simple to truly appreciate each individual color and visual texture.

Pattern Play- Mixing It Up with Fine Foliage
Patterns of different of different densities and sizes

Canna 'Tropicanna' stripes WORK with the detailed leaves of this Coleus.

Canna ‘Tropicanna’ stripes WORK with the detailed leaves of this Coleus.

Phormium 'Chieftain' vertical stripes and unified color are intriguing with the sunset tones of the tropical foliage that sits low and wide below.

The Phormium ‘Chieftain’ brings its vertical stripes and unified color to an intriguing with the sunset tones of the tropical Acalypha foliage that sits low and wide below.

Another gorgeous example with Coleus 'Smallwood Driveway' from Hort Couture.

Another gorgeous example with Coleus ‘Smallwood Driveway’ from Hort Couture.

Space Patterns Out

Rubber Plant while the Rubber Plant even picks up a bit of the red begonia too!

Silvery Brunnera with delicate veining sits opposite the Variegated Rubber Plant with a little breathing room from the green Asparagus Fern. The Rubber Plant even picks up a bit of the red begonia too!

Combine large patterns against small patterns.
Pattern Play- Mixing It Up with Fine FoliageIncorporate varying scales to the plants so that the patterns don’t compete with one another.  Ideally, sticking with the rule of three, pick one large, one medium and one small pattern to work with. In these examples using two worked, but three is much more interesting if you can make it work.
The large Caladium leaves have a fairly detailed pattern on them, but the large surface area of those big luscious leaves off-sets that when combined with the smaller and more subtle detail of the Pseuderanthemum ‘Stainless Steel’.

Ipomea 'Chipotle' has small, subtle dots and splotches of of spicy lime while the Acalypha 'Jungle Cloak' carries the big and bold tones and patterns.

Feel the energy and movement with Ipomea ‘Chipotle’ with it’s small, subtle dots and splotches of spicy lime while the Acalypha ‘Jungle Cloak’ carries the big, sophisticated tones and patterns.

What would YOU mix with the amazing colors of 'Jungle Cloak' Acalypha?

What would YOU mix with the amazing colors of ‘Jungle Cloak’ Acalypha?

Mix a foliage pattern with a flowering plant in the same color family.
Sure, indulge in gorgeous flowers, but use the power of color to unite the saturated tones foliage with it too! This can just as easily be done with more understated tones too.

Oxalis 'Plum Crazy' from Hort Couture WORKS with the complimentary color of Celosia bloom as well as the dusky colored foliage.

Oxalis ‘Plum Crazy’ from Hort Couture WORKS with the complimentary color of Celosia bloom as well as the dusky colored foliage.

What flower would you pair with this devinely rich toned Cordyline 'Mocho Latte'?

What flower would you pair with this divinely rich-toned Cordyline ‘Mocho Latte’?

HOLY COW! Can you even dream up what you might put with this incredible edible Basil 'PESTO Chocolate Swirl' coming out in 2015 from Hort Couture? I am drooling just thinking about the possibilities!

HOLY COW! Can you even dream up what you might put with this incredible edible Basil ‘PESTO Chocolate Swirl’ coming out in 2015 from Hort Couture? I am drooling just thinking about the possibilities!

Be sure to visit Hort Couture Plants for more fantastic foliage ideas available in your locally owned garden center! With these tips, hopefully you will be on your way to using some Fine Foliage to be come a savvy pattern mixing designer, no matter what method you choose to make it work for your style!

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Fine Foliage – What Makes A Spring Sophisticate?

#FineFoliage #Spring SophisicateWhen spring rolls around and we are finally let out of our house to play amongst the plants, we fling ourselves to the garden center and start lolling about the colorful rainbow of flowers. Which ones? Hmmmm, one of each? Yes, Primroses, Pansies, Hyacinths… Yes, you KNOW what’s coming, I have to say it. Ready?

Now repeat after me, “Flowers are fleeting, foliage is forever.” Ahhhhh, now isn’t that better?

A sophisticated container like this that I created for one of my clients is a great alternative to starting out the season with flowers that will only last a short while before the heat of summer is upon us. This shady courtyard entry is dark and contemporary, but I adored the clients choice of the tall, black, column pot for me to create this design.

One of my favorite modern color combinations is ideally suited to this location. Gold or chartreuse and white or white variegation lends itself to coming across as so clean, fresh and textural. I love how the two leaf shapes mirror each other in a way. But, the real star of this container combination is the quirky conifer. I specifically chose it because of its sweet tilt. It gives not only a contrast of texture, but a fresh green distinction from the other palmate shaped leaves.

This refined spring combination will continue to look great well into the growing season. Still think you need a floral based design to feel like its spring? Now repeat after me….. 🙂

Key Players:
‘Stoplight’ Foamy Bells, Heucherella– Citrus bold color foliage contrasted with red veins is striking and radiant in the shady nooks and corners of the garden or containers. It’s fluffy foliage stays colorful in part shade to shade from spring to fall. Profuse white flowers are charming in spring and hold for months. 14-16″ tall and wide for zones 4-9

‘Gryphon’ Begonia– Upright, green splashed with silver and white palmate foliage is a full on thriller in a container out in the garden or as a tremendously hardy houseplant. In part shade to shade, it has subtle, blush pink flowers and grows 16-18″ tall and wide for zones 7-11.

Slender Hinoki False Cypress, Chamaecyperis obtusa ‘Gracilis’– This graceful, arching branched conifer is a lovely and narrow small-scale tree in a container or garden. Its open branched, pyramidal form is loaded with sophisticated personality with its tiny, deep green needles and bronze winter color. Slow growing in part shade to full sun maxing out at 8-12 ft. tall by 4-5 ft. wide in zones 4-8.

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