Tag Archives: Mini-Arrangements

Big Ideas for Designing with Mini Leaves

IMG_5903

Whit’s End – a paradise for children of all ages – and a wonderful showcase of design ideas using miniature foliage

I’m just back after a whirlwind tour of Buffalo, New York – boy do those folks know how to do foliage! Hostas must be the #1 selling plant, available in every conceivable shade of green, blue-green, blue, gold and white and ranging in size from monsters to miniatures. I was especially struck by the creative ways homeowners found to showcase the more petite specimens.

The American Hosta Society has set various standards as to what constitutes a mini (and these criteria have changed over the years). You can read about them here. I had a hard time imagining how they could be incorporated in my 5 acre garden (assuming deer and slugs left them alone) but after seeing these ideas I’m feeling inspired.

Edging a border

IMG_5986

Mike Shadrack places smaller specimens where they won’t be obstructed from view

By placing these minis at the front of a stone-edged border they invite closer viewing, while having larger hostas at the back of the border gives a fun play on distorting the perspective!

Word Play

IMG_5955

Marcia Sully plays with her Mouse series hostas

I’m sure you’ve come across the Mouse Ears mini hosta that started the popular series in 2000. There are now lots of sports from the original blue Mouse Ears including this one (whose tag I forgot to photograph – sorry!)

Love how Marcia has used the cute metal mouse to emphasize the name, but she didn’t stop there…

IMG_5952

A game of cats and mice

This grouping of mini hostas, watchful cats and cute little mice is a wonderful display. I could have sat and made up fun stories of these characters for a series of children’s books, couldn’t you?

While many of the mini hostas are displayed in their own container, a few are grouped together.

Creating a Scene

IMG_5916

Mixed design using mini hostas with other elements

When combining mini hostas with other plants, it is essential to keep the scale in mind. The container above is an excellent example, with several mini hostas, each offering a unique leaf shape and color, combined with a dwarf conifer in an aged hypertufa trough accented by a cheeky snail. The largest green/white hosta plays the role of a large tree or shrub in this scene.

IMG_5901

Just one of several remarkable train set vignettes in this garden known as Whit’s End (A play on the homeowner’s last name)

Once again, hostas are combined with dwarf conifers, this time creating a life-like vignette, as two men pump the handcart endlessly around the train tracks! Such fun.

Ideas to Take Home

Although these ideas all feature mini hostas you could re-interpret them to showcase your favorite miniatures such as:

  • Smaller succulents
  • Mini coleus
  • Dwarf conifers

Share your ideas with us in the comments below or on our Facebook page.

Portrait of a Foliage Color Palette – Silvers

January 2013 Foliage and Bloom 158.CR2 copy

Have you ever gone in to a fabric store and had the clerk snip samples of fabrics to help you with design ideas? You can come up with your own design palette with even the smallest pieces of fabric for an outfit or for an entire room, then springboard into all of the other details from there.

How about taking that same idea and creating a foliage palette for a container or garden space in a similar way? Create mini-arrangements of various types in a little shot glass or small bowl to see what you like together. Winter and early spring is particularly great for this as you’re looking at your building block essentials in the garden at this time of the year.

In this vignette you see Artemisia ‘Cirrus’, a plant that ranks high on my must have list. Helleborus sternii ‘Silver Dollar’, Parahebe perfoliata and Heuchera ‘Green Spice’. All of these are hardy here in my part sun, zone 7-8 (Seattle area), but check with your local nursery expert or Master Gardener about hardiness in your area.

This palette of silvers that range from whites to blue tones is rich with the winter bronze on the Heuchera that has that hint of milk chocolate in the veining. In the spring, the Heuchera will revert to its soft silvery-green with burgundy veining as an elegant foil to all that silver.

The good manners caveat here is that you don’t ever snip where it’s not invited. A good friend or a neighbors garden with permission is different than snipping without permission in a nursery or botanical garden.