Tag Archives: Pettifers

Framing a View with Fine Foliage

 

A literal frame in the landscape of Alyson Markley.

Do you have a spectacular view somewhere in your landscape that you would like to highlight? No? OK, how about a mediocre view? Or even a peek-a-boo view? Maybe your view is around a corner and down a path. Or maybe it’s not a “view” at all but a focal point like a tree, garden art or seating area that you want to feature.
Leading the eye by using foliage “frames” the view and thereby directs the eye to where you want to look. In the case above, the bamboo is planted densely, enclosing the path and making you want to venture further to see what’s at the end of the path.
This view of the pool house at Chanticleer is iconic. The copper verdigris roofline echoes the exquisite color of the Arizona Cypress (Cupressus arizonica var. glabra ‘Blue Ice‘) on either side of the entry gate. They provide a sense of scale against the cupola as well as luscious fragrance.
Here at the famous Hidcote garden, this section of the border was emphasized with all manner of red and burgundy foliage that takes you all the way down the path, looking left and right as the color carries you to the gate at the far end.
Another iconic view at Hidcote stops you abruptly to look at the masterful pruning of the boxwood and then to the fountain pool and then further through the archway and beyond.
The beautiful garden art sculpture set into the yew hedge is masterfully framed by this unique arch of what I think is a type of Hornbeam, but I can’t confirm which one. The foliage was a very silvery white!
The intense blue of this epic glass sculpture by Dale Chihuly against the pink toned building in the background is expertly framed by multi-trunked Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia) trees and their reddish toned bark guides you straight down this path. All of the colors are working together brilliantly.
Sometimes not exposing the full view of the scene (Huntington Botanic Garden), but simply giving the taste of what’s beyond and through is just enough titillation to make you want to find a way to see what’s over there.
This tightly constricted view to the meadow beyond forces you to stop, sit and ponder.
Here’s a glimpse through a hornbeam tunnel that you would meander down to the bench you see in the photo above in the gardens of Bourton Hall.
OR, maybe you want to show off an expansive view (Pettifers) all at once and make the landscape scene feel ever more accentuated by creating a perspective that forces both close inspection of certain plants and design as well as appreciating the overall composition.
I love the way the designers at Chanticleer used vertical and contrasting colored chunks of cut foliage to mark this path edge and force your focus toward the meadow beyond.
The same idea, only in much larger scale here at Bourton Hall, uses fastigiate yews to guide your eye parallel the water feature and into the distance.

When you think about your landscape design, large or small, are you using foliage to frame or lead your eye the parts of your design that you really want to emphasize?

Need More inspiration? Our latest book Gardening with Foliage First is cleverly organized to help you find designs just for fall for either shade or sun. Have you got your copy yet? Check it out here or using the affiliate link above.

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