Tag Archives: Portland Oregon

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

TEAM Fine Foliage is having a crazy busy spring week right now. We are both speaking at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show this week as well as running our own business’, writing our new book, traveling, making videos, having a kitchen makeover and on and on and on….So I thought it would be entertaining to post a whole bunch of juicy photos that illustrate some of the amazing foliage and bare winter branches that I have seen recently. Some of them are everyday plants used in unique ways and some are “Holy Cow” plant moments where you exclaim, I NEEEEEEEEED that!

Since Valentines Day is this week, you will find some Fine Foliage Valentines at the end of the post too! Enjoy and share this post with YOUR sweetie this week if you can’t be at the show to say “Hi” to both of us!

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

The blue toned foliage of this Euphorbia paired with the blue fronds of the yucca make a fine textural contrast. The orange toned euphorbia blooms will be stunning!

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Gardeners frequently underestimate the power color in evergreen trees this time of the year. Here Cryptomeria japonica and Gold Cypress make a handsome pair on a sunny late winter morning.

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Another spectacular euphorbia! This Euphorbia ‘rigida’ is expertly paired with ‘Lemon Wave’ Phormium and boxwood as seen outside Pomarius nursery in Portland, Oregon.

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Mahonia gracilipes in its beautiful late winter red, gracefully arches over Black Mondo grass.

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Gold willows are woven artistically and draw the attention away from the concrete slab below. Seen at McMenamin’s Edgefield outside of Portland, Oregon.

The Hottest Looks Foliage February 2015

Bamboo stems are a colorful art piece for the wide variety of colors that look so dramatic against a white wall.

The Hottest Looks Foliage February 2015

‘Ebony Pearl’ Rhododendron is not even in bloom and it’s a fashionista just for the amazing foliage!!

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Two conifers showing off complimentary winter colors make a great pair! ‘Rheingold’ arborvitae and ‘Golden Fernspray’ cypress.

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Now THIS is some RED just in time for Valentine Day. A Red Twig Dogwood shrub is the one that takes a backseat in this couples duo with native mahonia aquifolium in some outstanding winter color.

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Team Fine Foliage affectionately calls him “MR. Wissel” around here (we have no idea why, but it fits) for ‘Wissel’s Saguaro’ cypress, a BIG favorite of ours. He definitely takes center stage as the star that he is in this vignette.

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Daphniphyllum macropodum as of yet has no common name but whatever you want to call it, I call it spectacular!

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Variegated Daphniphyllum….sigh…..want!

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

Metapanex delavayi is a stunner here as the centerpiece of this bed. Sharing the limelight are Hellebore that echoes that incredible foliage color.

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

A Valentine Day buffet of Heuchera foliage colors!

The Hottest Looks in Foliage February 2015

A 14ft. tall succulent Valentine is the PERFECT idea for your sweetie! Created by Robin Stockwell of Succulent Gardens.

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“Points of Distinction”- a video from Fine Foliage

Watch for an exciting contest coming soon from FINE FOLIAGE!

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Hot White Chic Style for Summer 2014

By now you might have noticed that I have a certain affinity for shade plants. Maybe it’s because I don’t have that much shade in my own yard to play in that it grabs my focus SO much. Maybe it is also because I love the challenge of finding new and different ways to bring light and airiness to dark places.

Spider Web Fatsia container in a shady nook.

Spider Web Fatsia container in a shady nook.

On a recent tour of gardens with 80 other garden bloggers in Portland Oregon, I noticed a hot trend among some of the designers that I took note of in particular. The use of this amazing new Fatsia ‘Spider Web’ or ‘Speckled Fatsia’. It brings a light bit of a tropical feeling to some darker corners. See the link for more details on this amazing and slightly rare plant.

'Yakushimanum' Rhododendron paired with the icy cool 'Spider Web' Fatsia.

‘Yakushimanum’ Rhododendron paired with the icy cool ‘Spider Web’ Fatsia brings a slightly masculine flair.

I was ceaselessly impressed by the drama these leaves could impart to almost any low-light location with the large palmate leaves and the elegant white Chanel-esque presence it brings to what could be a drab vignette.

A more feminine combination with the pink Lacecap Hydrangea.

A more feminine combination with the pink Lacecap Hydrangea.

If you live in a climate where you can’t grow this Fatsia outdoors, I’m told that it makes an exceptional houseplant. However you come to use this elegant and highly fashionable plant, it will serve you well and you just might become one of the many obsessed over designing with Fine Foliage in the shade.

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New Zealand Sends Fine Foliage to Seattle

New Zealand Garden Are you ready to go on a little adventure walk with me? C’mon, we will go see some amazing foliage! In the summer of 2012, the Arboretum Foundation of Seattle began installation of one small part of a larger puzzle called Pacific Connections; an Eco-geographic display of native flora and fauna from regions such as Cascadia, Australia, China, Chile and New Zealand with similar climate features to our own in the Seattle area.

The phase of the project I’m showing off today is the New Zealand Forest. There is a plethora of wonderfully well written articles to read that will give you some in-depth understanding of what this all entails from the preparation of the site to the plant selection. Here is a piece that is for the plant collectors out there!
I wish that I could give you all of the proper plant names for these shots right now, but unfortunately, I didn’t have time to get them as these shots were taken last fall on a VERY cold day and I was getting numb! The incredible Cistus Nursery outside of Portland Oregon is supplying plants for this exhibit, so you may find the vast majority in this catalog. Here is another resource for plant names as well. As time will allow, I will go back and update some of these names for you, or if you are a Hort-Head like me, feel free to leave a comment with a plant name.

New Zealand Garden, Seattle ArboretumThe foliage combinations are really the main focus here anyway. So, take the lesson in use of the colors and textures and apply them to your own climate and design style. The shot above deftly shows this plant with purple stems and silver foliage that bears an almost Holly-like detail on the leaf next to what appears to be an Ilex shrub. The contrast of the two is a blend of wild and refined. I LOVE it!

New Zealand Garden, Seattle ArboretumDrought tolerant plants are efficient in the higher elevations of New Zealand as well as in the Seattle area too. You might never imagine that our region can be quite drought ridden at times when we have SUCH a reputation for rain. But, grasses like this beautiful silver Astelia in the foreground are great with sharp drainage. Small leaved plants are also the big winners too as they can handle the heat in summer and deflect rain well in heavy, wet winters.

New Zealand Garden, Seattle ArboretumPittosporum tenuifolium ‘Elizabeth’ is the plant on the right of this photo. I adore the black stems with the white variegation, plus the growth habit is tidy too!

New Zealand Garden, Seattle ArboretumTo the left of the rock, different cultivars of Hebes grow in tidy mounds while a Green New Zealand Flax or Phormium stands up tall giving a sword-like foliage texture for them to snuggle against. The ground cover filling in here is the gorgeous ‘Purple Haze’ Acaena, one that I am going to bring into my own garden this season. I love it with the autumn color of the tree in the background.

Acaena 'Purple Haze' is the carpet of groundcover from which this lovely dark Carex grass emerges.

Acaena ‘Purple Haze’ is the carpet of ground cover from which this lovely dark Carex grass emerges.

New Zealand Garden, Seattle ArboretumNew Zealand Garden, Seattle ArboretumAnother elegant example of the Variegated Pittosporum and grass textures together, planted next to the Purple foliage color Pittosporum ‘Atropurpureum’ or Purple Kohuhu.

New Zealand Garden, Seattle ArboretumI noticed these in the distance and at first thought they were Rhododendrons, of course they aren’t but, I adore the growth habit of these small trees. This shot is cropped from quite a distance, so I didn’t have the where with all to climb down the small ravine to investigate- but they are BEAUTIFUL!

New Zealand Garden, Seattle ArboretumThe green New Zealand Flax in the “Hebe/Heath” section is such a brilliant textural contrast to the bushy plants in the foreground from the Heath family. The rich, green, upright Heath are perfectly suited for the “Emerald City” as Seattle is known, and the lower bushy ones with a slightly burgundy stem are Hebe.

I hope that you enjoyed our quick little stroll through a garden of foliage that might ordinarily be out of reach for many of us to visit in its native land. The Arboretum Foundation is a doing a masterful job at bringing the world to Seattle in a garden!

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